Inside Look at Arbitration Training with Instructor, Andy Livingston

Photo: Andy Livingston, CEO of Dexterity Consulting and arbitration instructor at Kompass

Over the last few years there's been a considerable uptick in demand for alternative dispute resolution services like arbitration and mediation.

The pandemic has only accelerated this trend as people look to settle their conflicts outside of court.

And lawyers aren't the only ones pursuing careers in ADR.

People from diverse professional backgrounds are taking mediation and arbitration training to better handle workplace disputes - or set up private ADR practices.

This week we spoke with Andy Livingston, a social sciences graduate turned certified ADR professional, who runs a private practice and teaches arbitration training at Kompass.

Andy walks us through the online arbitration certificate and explains different pathways to becoming an arbitrator in Canada.

Think you might be interested in this course? Read on for an inside look.

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Beginner's Guide to Arbitration Careers, Training, and Certificates

Arbitration is one of the most popular forms of alternative dispute resolution (ADR).

Similar to a judge, an arbitrator is a neutral third party who hears witnesses and reviews evidence before delivering a judgment that is usually legally binding.

However, arbitration is less formal than courtroom litigation and typically less costly and time-consuming.

And unlike the court system, parties involved in arbitration are allowed to choose their own arbitrator, and can design the process to suit their own needs. That means they can choose the timing and place of the arbitration, as well as who will be present.

Another key benefit of arbitration is privacy. Proceedings are confidential, which is generally considered a major advantage over litigation.

But how does one start a career in arbitration?  What kind of training pathways and certifications are available in Canada?

Here is a simple breakdown of arbitration careers, training options, and professional designations.

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Family Mediator Careers: Explore Practice Areas & Specializations

Updated February 2024

Family mediators help families settle conflicts and disagreements without going to court.

Mediators do not take sides or make decisions. Instead, they help each party understand the other's concerns, explore options, and agree on solutions.

Family mediators are often called in when a couple decides to end their relationship. They help the ex-partners work out arrangements regarding children, property, and finances.

But while divorce is a common family mediator practice area, it's not the only one. In fact, a variety of specializations exist within the field.

In this post, we explore four major practice areas in family mediation—and some helpful information on getting started in this career.

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Is Human Resources a Good Career? Pros, Cons & Things to Consider

Updated January 2024

The field of human resources has transformed quite dramatically over the past few years. We used to think of HR as primarily about handling employee discipline problems, enforcing workplace policies, and hiring/firing people.

But as global business competition grows ever more intense, and new generations join the workforce, we’re seeing a major shift in the reality and perception of HR. 

Human resources professionals are joining strategy sessions with CEOs and other C-suite executives to discuss the growing importance and impact of employee engagement, talent acquisition, and skills development. 

HR has become an essential and integral part of business success, in every sector of the economy. 

Is human resources the right career for you? Consider these key points while making your decision.

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Workplace Safety vs. Workplace Wellness: What's the Difference?

Health and safety managers are tasked with looking out for the physical, mental, and emotional health of staff members at all levels of an organization.

That means more than just avoiding accidents. The most effective health and safety (H&S) plans incorporate both safety and wellness.

But what's the difference between the two?

In a nutshell: Workplace safety initiatives revolve around preventing illness and injury on the job. Everyone is required to follow the rules and non-compliance can have serious consequences.

On the other hand, workplace health and wellness initiatives are aimed at promoting healthy behaviours (including mental health and emotional well-being). These are often voluntary programs, so participation is not mandatory.

Learn which workplace health and safety initiatives fall into each category—and why a good OHS plan must include elements from both.

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Health and Safety Management Certificate: Meet the Instructor

Many organizations are still struggling to redefine and optimize their approach to workplace safety and employee wellness.

We're seeing growing demand for health and safety leaders who can balance business objectives with the increasingly complex needs of workers. 

From hygiene control to mental health to the unique needs of people working from home: health and safety in today's environment poses a whole new set of challenges.

Striving to enhance your skills and stay ahead of the curve?

This is exactly what we teach in the new Health and Safety Management certificate at Kompass.

This week, we interviewed the instructor, Kylie Boyd to get an inside look at the training.

Kylie has over 17 years of experience in H&S leadership and has taught courses at both the undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Meet the instructor and find out what this course has to offer.

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Becoming a Public Policy Analyst: 5 Key Skills to Succeed

Updated January 2023

What exactly is public policy and what does an analyst do?

In a nutshell, we can think of public policy as a system of laws, regulations, and courses of action implemented by government. These directives touch every aspect of our lives, including education, law enforcement, the allocation of environmental resources, healthcare, etc.

Ideally, public policy is developed to serve the public interest. But ideas about what is "best" for the public are always changing, influenced by shifting values, and evolving social, political, and economic needs.

Therefore, public policy is constantly in flux. Government commitments change. Public interests change.

How do decision-makers choose which new policies to introduce, and how best to develop and implement them?

Enter the public policy analyst.

Public policy analysts advise governments at all levels on which new policies are needed and what's involved in launching those policies.

In this post, we break down the core skills required to do this job well and truly thrive in the challenging, ever-complex sphere of policy leadership.

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Public Policy Training: 5 Ways to Strengthen Your Policy Proposals

Updated January 2023

So much skill, care, and hard work goes into developing thorough policy recommendations. Analysts spend months gathering research, analyzing data, developing solutions, and evaluating pros, cons, and possible outcomes from every angle.

Then comes the crucial stage of presenting those findings in a comprehensive proposal.

In addition to ensuring accuracy and thoroughness, what else should policy analysts do to make sure their ideas are clearly understood and highly valued?

Start with these five steps to more impactful and persuasive policy proposals.

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What Skills Do You Learn in a Public Policy Certificate? Key Takeaways

Updated January 2023

Public policy refers to the collection of laws and regulations that governments create in response to problems or issues. Such directives are meant to support and promote the collective good.

A public policy certificate program focuses on helping students understand how those laws and regulations are put together.

Training at this level should provide an overview of the policy development cycle and the core skills needed to drive effective decision-making.

And there are plenty of reasons to consider public policy training. The field offers a unique opportunity to create directives that support the well-being of Canadians.

All levels of government rely on skilled policy professionals to help solve complex problems related to law enforcement, education, public health, the environment, social justice, and a host of other important issues.

In this post, we outline what you can expect from a public policy certificate. Find out what this type of training includes and decide if it's right for you.

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What Are the 4 Types of ADR? Compare Methods, Pros and Cons

The primary goal of alternative dispute resolution (ADR)  is to settle disputes without litigation.

Going to court often involves a long and arduous process—and doesn’t always produce a beneficial result. 

This is precisely what ADR is designed to avoid: the time delayscosts, anxiety, and sometimes disappointing outcomes of litigation. 

ADR is used to settle disputes in a wide range of practice areas, including:

☑️ Family matters 

☑️ Commercial contracts 

☑️ Workplace disputes 

☑️ Labour relations 

☑️ Business and consumer disputes 

☑️ Intellectual property 

☑️ Sports 

☑️ Construction 

☑️ International trade deals 

☑️ Torts 

There are four main types of ADR. Many alternative dispute resolution professionals build skills across all four modalities, so they can choose or combine approaches to suit clients' needs.

In this post, we'll guide you through each ADR type, including common pros and cons of each model. 

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