Meet Mediation and Arbitration Instructor Rola Mustafa

Rola Mustafa began her career as a lawyer, but quickly recognized the value of addressing conflicts in a non-adversarial way. Her passion for alternative dispute resolution led her to pursue accreditation in mediation from multiple organizations. She also became a certified global trainer and has coached dozens of mediators in both Canada and Syria.

Now, she brings all that expertise to Kompass as an instructor in the mediation, family mediation, and arbitration certificate programs.

We spoke with Rola this week to learn more about her background and what prospective ADR students should know. Read on for the highlights.

Read More ❯

Arbitration Certificate: See What’s New and Improved

Arbitration has become an increasingly popular method for resolving disputes in various sectors and industries. Skilled arbitrators allow parties to save time and money and maintain confidentiality.

But of course, the profession is always evolving, with new case law, new tools, and new techniques.

Kompass recently updated and refreshed its online arbitration training to keep up with the latest changes. We spoke with the course instructor, qualified arbitrator Andy Livingston, to learn more about the enhancements and the state of the ADR industry in general.

Read More ❯

3 ADR Trends That Are Shaping the Industry in 2024

Across the globe, several key factors have helped legitimize alternative dispute resolution (ADR) as an effective means of settling conflicts outside of court. 

The ever-rising expense of litigation is a main driver, along with hopelessly backlogged courts and the stress of drawn-out legal battles. 

As an industry, ADR is maturing and evolving at a rapid rate. Mediators and arbitrators are becoming increasingly sophisticated and specialized, tackling more complex cases, and developing more nuanced ADR techniques. 

What’s the next stage of growth for alternative dispute resolution? Here's a look at three major trends that are changing and shaping the ADR industry right now.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Expanded Use of Technology in Dispute Resolution
  2. ADR Spreading Into New Contexts
  3. New Collaboration Between OAFM and FDRIO

 

Read More ❯

Your Guide to Mediation and Arbitration Designations in Canada

Updated September 2023

Mediation and arbitration are not currently regulated in Canada, this means you don't have to hold a designation to practise as a mediator or arbitrator in Canada. However, earning a designation from the well-respected ADR Institute of Canada will give you credibility as a professional in the field.

You should also know that family mediation is treated differently than other forms of alternative dispute resolution. If you want to provide court-connected family mediation services, you typically need to become certified through an organization like Family Mediation Canada or the Ontario Association for Family Mediation.

In this post, we take you through the different designations that are available from each organization, what it takes to earn them, and how Kompass can help.

Read More ❯

Becoming a Mediator or Arbitrator in Ontario? What to Know About ADRIO

The field of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) is not regulated in Canada. There is no official body that governs the conduct of ADR professionals.

However, the ADR Institute of Ontario (ADRIO) plays a key role in setting educational and ethical standards for mediators and arbitrators throughout the province. Membership is voluntary, but comes with a number of benefits.

Read More ❯

How Do You Become an Arbitrator in Canada? Accreditation Options

Considering becoming an arbitrator, and struggling to navigate the confusing array of professional designations available in Canada?

Here's the scoop: technically, you don't need an official designation to become an arbitrator in Canada. However, those who obtain accreditation through a recognized association enjoy a much higher degree of credibility.

The Alternative Dispute Resolution Institute of Canada (ADRIC), along with its regional affiliates, is a leading provider of professional designations to arbitrators across the country.

In this post, we outline the different levels of accreditation offered through ADRIC and explain what it takes to achieve each one.

Read on to get a clearer sense of the path you can follow to launch a successful career in arbitration.

Read More ❯

Arbitration vs Mediation vs Conciliation: Differences, Pros and Cons, Applications

Arbitration, mediation, and conciliation are popular forms of dispute resolution that offer interesting and diverse career opportunities.

People pursue alternative dispute resolution (ADR) training and accreditation for a number of reasons. Some aspire to become professional mediators or arbitrators. Others are simply looking to handle conflict better in their personal relationships or workplace.

It’s certainly an industry in demand. From business disputes to divorce settlements, people are turning to ADR as a more flexible, less costly, and more time-effective means of resolving conflicts.

Arbitration, mediation, and conciliation offer three different approaches to conflict resolution. They differ in terms of procedure and outcomes, as well as training and accreditation.

In this post, we guide you through clear definitions of arbitration versus mediation and conciliation, including applications along with pros and cons. Let's get started.

Read More ❯

Inside Look at Arbitration Training with Instructor, Andy Livingston

Photo: Andy Livingston, CEO of Dexterity Consulting and arbitration instructor at Kompass

Over the last few years there's been a considerable uptick in demand for alternative dispute resolution services like arbitration and mediation.

The pandemic has only accelerated this trend as people look to settle their conflicts outside of court.

And lawyers aren't the only ones pursuing careers in ADR.

People from diverse professional backgrounds are taking mediation and arbitration training to better handle workplace disputes - or set up private ADR practices.

This week we spoke with Andy Livingston, a social sciences graduate turned certified ADR professional, who runs a private practice and teaches arbitration training at Kompass.

Andy walks us through the online arbitration certificate and explains different pathways to becoming an arbitrator in Canada.

Think you might be interested in this course? Read on for an inside look.

Read More ❯

Beginner's Guide to Arbitration Careers, Training, and Certificates

Arbitration is one of the most popular forms of alternative dispute resolution (ADR).

Similar to a judge, an arbitrator is a neutral third party who hears witnesses and reviews evidence before delivering a judgment that is usually legally binding.

However, arbitration is less formal than courtroom litigation and typically less costly and time-consuming.

And unlike the court system, parties involved in arbitration are allowed to choose their own arbitrator, and can design the process to suit their own needs. That means they can choose the timing and place of the arbitration, as well as who will be present.

Another key benefit of arbitration is privacy. Proceedings are confidential, which is generally considered a major advantage over litigation.

But how does one start a career in arbitration?  What kind of training pathways and certifications are available in Canada?

Here is a simple breakdown of arbitration careers, training options, and professional designations.

Read More ❯

What Are the 4 Types of ADR? Compare Methods, Pros and Cons

The primary goal of alternative dispute resolution (ADR)  is to settle disputes without litigation.

Going to court often involves a long and arduous process—and doesn’t always produce a beneficial result. 

This is precisely what ADR is designed to avoid: the time delayscosts, anxiety, and sometimes disappointing outcomes of litigation. 

ADR is used to settle disputes in a wide range of practice areas, including:

☑️ Family matters 

☑️ Commercial contracts 

☑️ Workplace disputes 

☑️ Labour relations 

☑️ Business and consumer disputes 

☑️ Intellectual property 

☑️ Sports 

☑️ Construction 

☑️ International trade deals 

☑️ Torts 

There are four main types of ADR. Many alternative dispute resolution professionals build skills across all four modalities, so they can choose or combine approaches to suit clients' needs.

In this post, we'll guide you through each ADR type, including common pros and cons of each model. 

Read More ❯

1 2

Most Read