How Do You Become an Arbitrator in Canada? Accreditation Options

Considering becoming an arbitrator, and struggling to navigate the confusing array of professional designations available in Canada?

Here's the scoop: technically, you don't need an official designation to become an arbitrator in Canada. However, those who obtain accreditation through a recognized association enjoy a much higher degree of credibility.

The Alternative Dispute Resolution Institute of Canada (ADRIC), along with its regional affiliates, is a leading provider of professional designations to arbitrators across the country.

In this post, we outline the different levels of accreditation offered through ADRIC and explain what it takes to achieve each one.

Read on to get a clearer sense of the path you can follow to launch a successful career in arbitration.

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Mediation Certification in Canada: What Are the Rules & Steps?

Considering a career in mediation? Your first priority is to understand the types of mediation certification available in Canada, at both the regional and national levels.

It can get a bit confusing because technically, mediation is not a regulated profession in Canada. There is no legally mandated training or licensing process for mediators.

However, Canada does have a powerful organization that sets clear standards and guidelines for mediator training and professional practice. This organization is called the Alternative Dispute Resolution Institute of Canada (ADRIC). It encourages mediators and arbitrators to self-regulate by offering a variety of designations that are highly respected across the country.

It comes down to this: if you want to be recognized as a competent mediator, you'll need to earn a designation from the ADR Institute.

So where do you begin? What rules and steps must you follow to become a certified mediator?

In this post, we break down the process from start to finish. Here's what you need to know.

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Arbitration vs Mediation vs Conciliation: Differences, Pros and Cons, Applications

Arbitration, mediation, and conciliation are popular forms of dispute resolution that offer interesting and diverse career opportunities.

People pursue alternative dispute resolution (ADR) training and accreditation for a number of reasons. Some aspire to become professional mediators or arbitrators. Others are simply looking to handle conflict better in their personal relationships or workplace.

It’s certainly an industry in demand. From business disputes to divorce settlements, people are turning to ADR as a more flexible, less costly, and more time-effective means of resolving conflicts.

Arbitration, mediation, and conciliation offer three different approaches to conflict resolution. They differ in terms of procedure and outcomes, as well as training and accreditation.

In this post, we guide you through clear definitions of arbitration versus mediation and conciliation, including applications along with pros and cons. Let's get started.

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Pre-mediation: What It Is and Why It’s Important

Mediation has become an increasingly popular option for settling family disputes in Ontario. It’s typically quicker, more cost-effective, and less adversarial than going to court.

Mediators need to prepare and support their clients to make sure each party can participate fully. They need to be alert to anything that can adversely affect a client's ability to engage in the process, such as mental health issues or family violence.

That's why they meet with each party beforehand to understand the factors involved. This is known as pre-mediation, or "screening in."

Thinking about a career in mediation? Keep reading to learn what the intake process involves and why it’s so important.

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Public Policy: What It Is, Why It’s Important, and How to Get Involved

Public policy can be described as the strategy governments use to meet the needs of society.

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Family Mediator Skills & Qualifications: What You Need to Succeed

Are you interested in helping Ontario families work through their differences without going to court?

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Online Public Policy Certificate: Meet the Instructor, Explore the Course

Becoming a public policy advisor or analyst offers a unique chance to make a real difference in the lives of millions of Canadians.

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Onboarding Best Practices in a Remote Work Environment

The way you integrate a new hire into your organization has a huge impact on that employee’s motivation and engagement.

Done well, onboarding helps new employees understand expectations, attitudes, tools, policies, and processes. It also helps them develop a sense of connection and camaraderie with both their team and the larger organization.

But that’s not easy to accomplish when people are working from home.

Team members who don’t share the same physical space aren’t able to absorb company culture and norms organically. They can’t just shadow a colleague all day and drop in on casual conversations around the water cooler.

So how can you help remote employees get set up for success right from the get-go?

Check out these best practices for virtual onboarding.

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3 Ways Community Mental Health Courses Improve Your Job Performance

Does your job put you into close contact with individuals you suspect suffer from mental health issues? Feel ill-equipped to properly support these people because you simply don't understand the challenges they're facing—or how best to intervene?

You are certainly not alone. Many community-serving professionals lack mental health training and awareness. They don't possess the knowledge or practical skills needed to recognize mental health problems, interact with individuals in crisis, or refer mentally ill people to the most appropriate health care services.

Lack of organized education in this area has led to a mental health crisis in Canada. One in three Canadians will have mental health problems at some point in their lives—which means every single one of us, either directly or indirectly, is impacted by the epidemic.

It's clear that we need stronger, widespread education and service initiatives at the government level, but grassroots training is also extremely important.

Community mental health courses are an excellent first step for professionals who work with and serve the public.

These are just three ways quality training can completely change the way you do (and feel about) your job.

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Cultivating Rapport with Mediation Clients: 4 Common Pitfalls to Avoid

It's quite possible that opposing parties of a mediation will not trust each other. Whatever issue has brought them to this process, you can assume both sides are feeling anxious and have their walls up.

This is why it's so crucial that all participants be able to trust you, the mediator. You are the one objective individual at the negotiation table—the stable center in the midst of all those swirling emotions, expectations, and uncertainty.

From the very first point of contact, until the issue at hand has been resolved, the mediator must earn and maintain the trust of his or her clients. One of the key ways mediators accomplish this is by cultivating rapport, putting participants at ease, and establishing an atmosphere of cooperation.

But in their eagerness to build rapport, mediators sometimes stumble into traps. Take a look at 4 common mistakes to avoid when you're seeking  to connect with your clients.

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