Is Cable Technician a Good Career? Pros & Cons to Know Upfront

Without cable technicians, we wouldn't have the networks that carry voice, video and data from one device to another.

Can you imagine a world without internet, phone, satellite, and cable TV services?

Cable technicians are the professionals who set up and repair the telecommunications infrastructure the world depends on. 

Thinking about becoming one of them? Wondering if you should pursue a cable technician career?

Before you can decide, you need to have a complete picture of what to expect. After all, every job has its ups and downs.

In this post, we outline the pros and cons of working in the network cabling field.

Take a balanced look at the role and see if it's right for you.

 

PRO: network cabling TRAINING IS SHORT

One of the big pluses of this trade is that it doesn't take long to get started.

You can begin a cable technician career by completing a 24-week structured cabling course.

That means you could go from a total beginner to a fully qualified technician in only 6 months.

If you're hoping for fast entry into the workforce, this could be the career path for you.

 

CON: CABLING WORK can be PHYSICALLY DEMANDING

Installing and repairing network cabling can be strenuous work.

You may have to pull cables a long distance or lift equipment that weighs 50 pounds or more.

Plus, cable technicians frequently work in tight spaces or at great heights. For instance, you may have to crawl under a house, climb a pole, or balance on an extension ladder.

So a certain level of physical fitness is required for a cable technician career.

 

PRO: CERTIFICATION IS OPTIONAL

In Ontario, network cabling specialist is a voluntary trade. You can choose to get certified, but you don't have to do so.

That means you don't have to spend extra time completing an apprenticeship and passing a certification exam.

However, becoming certified can help you stand out in the cable technician job market.

The good news is that the certification process only takes about 2.5 years (far less than skilled trades like plumber and electrician, which take around 4 years).

 

CON: CABLING WORK CAN BE DANGEROUS

As with most trades, there are hazards involved in laying cable.

For instance, trimming and cutting fiber-optic cables results in tiny glass shards. These can cause serious injuries if they get under your skin or into your food.

Technicians also face the risks of falling from heights or getting injured from carrying heavy equipment.

It's important to follow all safety protocols.

Quality network cabling specialist training includes safety certifications to make sure students understand how to protect themselves and others at work.

 

PRO: VARIETY OF NETWORK CABLING JOB OPTIONS

Once you finish your network cabling training, a wide range of career paths are open to you.

You could pursue roles like:

☑️ Network cabling specialist

☑️ Fibre-optic technician

☑️ CATV technician

☑️ Telecommunications contractor

☑️ Computer technician

You could work for IT firms, telecommunications carriers, Internet providers, network installation companies, and more.

So there are many options for jobs and employers.

 

CON: DEALING WITH BAD WEATHER

Cable technicians often work outdoors. That can be a plus on nice days.

But it can be a real drawback when the weather isn't so nice.

For instance, you might find yourself climbing a 50-foot pole in snow, rain, wind, or extreme heat.

If you're considering a cable technician career, you need to be prepared for whatever Mother Nature throws at you.

 

PRO: SOLID DEMAND FOR CABLE TECHNICIANS

It's a great time to start a cable technician career.

According to the Government of Canada Job Bank, telecommunications line and cable workers are in steady demand throughout Ontario.

Almost all regions of the province get 2/3 stars for employment outlook, which is considered fair.

As the population grows and telecom service providers invest more in infrastructure, the opportunities should continue to grow.

 

CON: IRREGULAR HOURS AND POSSIBLE TRAVEL

Cable technicians don't always work 9 to 5.

Because problems with voice and data networks can happen at any time, you may have to work shifts at night or on weekends or holidays.

Travel is common, too. Most companies require techs to hold a valid driver's license so they can get around to different job sites.

Depending on the job, you might even have to stay overnight in a remote location.

 

PRO: GOOD EARNING POTENTIAL

You can make a good living in this trade.

The Job Bank says cable technicians in Ontario earn a median salary of about $55,000. "Median" means that half of all technicians make more than that amount and half make less.

At the top end, technician salaries can be more than $83,000.

 

EXPLORE NETWORK CABLING TRAINING AT HERZING COLLEGE

Ready to learn more about becoming a cable technician?

Check out Herzing's Network Cabling Specialist program, which takes just 24 weeks to complete.

The program includes several safety certifications, such as confined spaces hazard awareness, working at heights, and lockout and tag safety.

Graduates have found work with Ontario companies like Rycom, Advanced Systems, and Bell Technical Solutions.

Click below to explore the program in more detail or chat live with an Admissions Advisor. We're here to help!

Explore the Network Cabling Specialist Program

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